For Minimally-invasive Gynecology Medical Professionals

Introduction

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is a high-volume academic hospital affiliated with Harvard Medical School. The BWH Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology offers a full range of highly competitive fellowship programs in addition to a busy resident teaching service. We are in a unique position to offer a strong candidate an opportunity to become proficient in a wide variety of MIGS techniques and to benefit from the large number of educational and research activities offered at our institution.

Our main goal is to graduate a competent MIGS surgeon as well as an academician that is ready to take on a leadership role within the MIGS community. The fellow will rotate with a number of experienced MIGS surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, allowing for exposure to a variety of techniques and procedures throughout the training period. Some of the more commonly performed procedures include TLH, LSH, laparoscopic myomectomy, sacrocolpopexy and surgical treatment of advanced endometriosis. The fellow will also gain experience in robotic surgery, gynecologic oncology procedures and urogynecologic surgery. Members of the division also perform a number of other procedures, such as laparoscopic abdominal cerclage, uterine artery occlusion, presacral neurectomy and a full range of hysteroscopic procedures. There is a pelvic pain clinic rotation built into the fellowship schedule each year, as well as a month-long “fellowship swap” with the MIGS Program at nearby Newton-Wellesley Hospital.

We believe it is very important to incorporate evidence-based medicine into surgical practice. In an effort to support this concept, the MIGS fellow will have an opportunity to obtain a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree through the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University. This unique program prepares physicians for clinical research responsibilities and for leadership roles in evaluating and improving all aspects of health care delivery. The MPH program is fully funded as part of the fellowship.

There are ample research and teaching opportunities within BWH and through Harvard Medical School. The fellow is expected to complete a minimum of two clinical research projects to be presented at national meetings and published in peer-reviewed journals.

Faculty

Sarah L. Cohen, MD, MPH 
Program Director
Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School
Director of Research, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

Dr. Cohen completed her residency training at Johns Hopkins Hospital before coming to BWH for MIGS fellowship. She stayed on as faculty at BWH after fellowship, and has since taken a leadership role in research and educational activities in the MIGS Division. Areas of special interest include tissue containment and techniques for morcellation as well as surgical education.

Jon I. Einarsson, MD, PhD, MPH  
Assistant Program Director
Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School
Division Director, Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

Dr. Einarsson did his initial medical training in Iceland and then completed residency and MIGS fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine. He joined BWH in 2006 and founded the MIGS Division. In addition to being an internationally renowned surgeon and researcher, he has held major leadership roles in the American Association of Gynecologic  Laparoscopists (AAGL), where he was President from 2015 to 2016.

Bolaji Ajao, MD, MPH
Instructor in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Ajao completed his residency training at Mayo Clinic and remained on staff before coming to BWH for MIGS fellowship. He completed his fellowship training in July 2016 and joined the BWH MIGS Division. Areas of special interest include surgical education.

Additional Faculty:
• Antonio Gargiulo, MD      
• James A. Greenberg, MD  
• Neeraj Kohli, MD      
• Vatche Minassian, MD, MPH  
• Michael Muto, MD

Fellowship Alumni

Yoko Suzuki (2008-2010)
Yoko returned to Tokyo after her fellowship to study fertility treatments and now has a private gynecologic practice in California.

Sarah Cohen (2010-2012)
Sarah is faculty at BWH, Director of Research and Fellowship Program Director for the MIGS Division.

Elmira Manoucheri (2012-2014)
Elmira works as a gynecologist at Kaiser Permanente in California.

Bolaji Ajao (2014-2016)
Bolaji is faculty at BWH in the MIGS Division, building his clinical, research and teaching endeavors.

Nisse Clark (2016-present)
Nisse completed residency at Tufts Medical Center.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the level of interaction with BWH/MGH Ob/Gyn residents? Harvard medical students?
There is a high degree of involvement with the residents, both in the operating room and in didactic environments. The MIGS faculty is dedicated to teaching minimally invasive surgical techniques to fellows and residents. As the MIGS fellow advances in experience, it is expected that he or she begins mentors residents with surgical cases as appropriate. There are several opportunities throughout the year to present lectures on MIGS topics, and we also coordinate simulation labs for the residents to practice surgical principles. Medical students are often present in the operating room and clinic, and the MIGS fellow is encouraged to instruct medical students as well.
Do you specialize more in robotic or conventional laparoscopy?
Our group tends to favor conventional (straight sticks) laparoscopy, but we also feel it is important that a graduating fellow have sufficient experience with robot-assisted surgery. A robotic training program is provided, and the MIGS fellows participate in robotic cases with MIGS faculty as well as the reproductive endocrinology attendings.
What exposure do you have to other surgical specialties?
We have a very close working relationship with BWH colleagues in reproductive surgery, gynecologic oncology and urogynecology. We encourage the fellow to work with these specialists to round out surgical experiences as much as possible. There is also an outpatient rotation with Assia Valovska, MD an anesthesiologist who specializes in treatment of pelvic pain. Additonally, there is an annual month-long “fellowship swap” with the MIGS fellow at nearby Newton-Wellesley Hospital to ensure exposure to a variety of techniques and cases.
Is there any OB call?
No, there are no obstetrics responsibilities with the MIGS fellowship.
What is the salary? What are options for moonlighting?
The salary is determined by Partners HealthCare,and is the standard salary for PGY5/6 at our hospital. There are options for moonlighting as a GYN provider on call as well.Is there a non-compete clause?
How many cases do fellows complete on average?
Past fellows have done approximately 400 to 500 cases per year.
How does the MPH work?
The T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University offers a Clinical Effectiveness Program with a focus on epidemiology and biostatistics for clinical research. This involves full time class for one to two months each summer of the fellowship, with optional electives or self study throughout the year depending on individual interest and projects. The fellow is exempt from clinical duties during this period of full time study over the summer. 

How to Apply

For more information, or to apply to the Fellowship in Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital please see the AAGL website.

Contact information:

75 Francis Street
ASB 1-3
Boston MA 02130
(617) 525-8582 (phone)
(617) 975-0900 (fax)

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL


For over a century, a leader in patient care, medical education and research, with expertise in virtually every specialty of medicine and surgery.

About BWH